THE STORY BEHIND THE HALLOWED JERSEYS
THAT HAVE COME TO DEFINE THE TOUR DE FRANCE

In 1919, the Tour de France made its comeback after a four-year, war-induced hiatus. Prior to the 325km 11th stage from Grenoble to Geneva, race director Henri Desgrange decided the rider in first place needed to be more clearly distinguished from his competitors. And so, before the 2am stage departure, race leader Eugène Christophe of France put on the first yellow jersey of the Tour de France. Its purpose was to visibly identify the race leader from his rivals. However it would prove to be the decisive moment for what has become one of cycling’s most fabled icons... The maillot jaune.

Its colour was chosen because it was the colour of the paper that L’Auto-Vélo, the race’s newspaper sponsor and predecessor to the modern L’Équipe, was printed on.
The 50th anniversary of the TDF in 1953 was celebrated by initiating the green jersey – the colour inspired by its lawn mower-producing sponsor, La Belle Jardinière. The organisers needed an incentive to keep riders from quitting, so stage placings were awarded with points, and thus the green jersey was born...The maillot vert.
It was only in 1975 that the first polka dot jersey was awarded, to the Belgian rider Lucien Van Impe. Why the polka dots? The original sponsor of the jersey was Chocolat Poulain, and the wrapper of the chocolate bar was polka dotted... The maillot à pois rouges.
The final white jersey was introduced in 1968 and hasn’t always signified the best young rider, but rather worn by the rider who was ranked highest across the board in the other classifications. In 1975 the meaning of the white jersey was changed to represent the best young rider. However in 1987 the competition attained its current format of being awarded to the best-placed rider under 26 years of age...The maillot blanc.
OUR TDF EDIT THAT CELEBRATES THE HISTORY